searching Engineering Collection Change databases

Image of Publication

  • Peer Reviewed
  • Citation only


about this publication

Leading a horse to water: An intervention to encourage student-centred learning by transitioning first-year engineering students

27th Annual Conference of the Australasian Association for Engineering Education : AAEE 2016

Abstract: Context: Face-to-face delivery has been the foundation of transitioning students' pre-tertiary pedagogical experiences. The introduction of blended, online and flipped delivery at tertiary level has resulted in the reduction of face-to-face contact hours. Because of competition by subjects for students' time, the time-poor amongst them continuously battle to keep focusing on subjects/topics that have percolated to the top of their priority list. The increased requirement for student-centred learning has become the logical compensation for the disappearing contact hours. Transitioning first-year engineering students experience difficulties with their exposure to student-centred learning. Identifying the success of interventions aimed at remedying their approach to learning at tertiary level can be extremely challenging.

Purpose: To investigate the effect on student's various assessments of an intervention that was designed to encourage their ongoing engagement with topics in an undergraduate first-year subject.

Approach: The data collected consisted of the cohort's de-identified on-going and final assessment results. Statistical comparisons were conducted between the students who took advantage of the intervention and the control group who did not.

Results: The assessment marks for the students were grouped into those who did not upload any "Conceptual Hurdle" question attempts (85 students), and those who did upload on at least one occasion (91 students). Statistical analysis indicated that significant improvements in all marks were achieved by those who uploaded on least one occasion.

Conclusions: Transitioning first-year tertiary engineering students are faced with a number of subjects which zealously compete for their limited study times. Their previous teacher-centred learning experience has prepared them to prioritise ongoing teacher-set tasks ahead of any other work. It is expected that the intervention outlined in our work will introduce transitioning first-year engineering students to the successful practice of student-centred/life-long learning.

To cite this article: Banky, George P and Blicblau, Aaron S. Leading a horse to water: An intervention to encourage student-centred learning by transitioning first-year engineering students [online]. In: 27th Annual Conference of the Australasian Association for Engineering Education : AAEE 2016. Lismore, NSW: Southern Cross University, 2016: 62-69. Availability: <http://search.informit.com.au/documentSummary;dn=701287583470470;res=IELENG> ISBN: 9780994152039. [cited 28 May 17].

Personal Author: Banky, George P; Blicblau, Aaron S; Source: In: 27th Annual Conference of the Australasian Association for Engineering Education : AAEE 2016. Lismore, NSW: Southern Cross University, 2016: 62-69. DOI: Document Type: Conference Paper ISBN: 9780994152039 Subject: Student-centered learning; Engineering students; College freshmen; Universities and colleges; Peer Reviewed: Yes Affiliation: (1) STEMed Group, Faculty of Science, Engineering and Technology, Swinburne University of Technology, email: gbanky@swin.edu.au
(2) STEMed Group, Faculty of Science, Engineering and Technology, Swinburne University of Technology

Database: Engineering Collection