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Abstract: Context: Engineering education is embarking on a new journey, where curriculum designers are needing evidence based research to understand how the use of 1:1 mobile devices can influence student perceptions of self-directed learning, to improve curriculum engagement and to measurable assessment outcomes. Using student perceptions of learning motivation and learning intervention theory, higher order thinking skills can be encouraged in problem-based learning. Understanding what is motivating students to learn when and using 1:1 mobile devices will help curriculum designers and facilitators to engage students.

Purpose: This paper will explore survey results of a recent study, revealing how students are responding to a self-directed curriculum design where engineering students are accessing learning interventions to enhance their learning experience when using 1:1 mobile device technology.

Approach: This study approach is focusing on answering the following questions:

How do engineering students use their 1:1 mobile devices for self-directed learning?

What learning motivation perceptions do engineering students have when they are making choices about using a 1:1 mobile device for their learning?

How does using a 1:1 mobile device translate into improved learning outcomes?

How does the improved learning outcomes foster a culture of innovation?

Finding answers to these questions is important for this study to provide academic rigour identify learning motivations that may prove useful for curriculum designers who are interested in developing self-directed learning pathways. It is accepted, technology is a student directed and socially accepted variable that is proving to be an important 'value-add' to the learning spaces of higher education students.

Results: An analysis has shown that student motivation is influenced by motivation variables when curriculum interventions are used in engineering courses. The data suggests that student perceptions of learning motivations can be an important factor to influence the level of engagement when using 1:1 devices for learning. Curriculum designers and course facilitators may benefit from implementing selective interventions with the aim to encourage higher order thinking when problem solving.

Conclusions: Engineering curriculum designers will benefit from this research when considering how best to implement 1:1 mobile devices as a motivating factor for learning. Learning interventions are an important factor in influencing student perceptions of motivation to learn when using 1:1 mobile devices.

To cite this article: Firipis, Arthur; Chandrasekaran, Sivachandran; Lyons, Liam; Palmer, Stuart and Joordens, Matthew. What is motivating engineering students to use 1:1 mobile devices for learning? [online]. In: 27th Annual Conference of the Australasian Association for Engineering Education : AAEE 2016. Lismore, NSW: Southern Cross University, 2016: 251-258. Availability: <http://search.informit.com.au/documentSummary;dn=683306766206307;res=IELENG> ISBN: 9780994152039. [cited 26 Jul 17].

Personal Author: Firipis, Arthur; Chandrasekaran, Sivachandran; Lyons, Liam; Palmer, Stuart; Joordens, Matthew; Source: In: 27th Annual Conference of the Australasian Association for Engineering Education : AAEE 2016. Lismore, NSW: Southern Cross University, 2016: 251-258. DOI: Document Type: Conference Paper ISBN: 9780994152039 Subject: Engineering--Education; Curriculum change; Motivation in education; Thought and thinking; Learning--Technique; Perception--Psychological aspects; Peer Reviewed: Yes Affiliation: (1) Engineering and Built Design, Deakin University, email: afiripis@deakin.edu.au
(2) Engineering and Built Design, Deakin University
(3) Engineering and Built Design, Deakin University
(4) Engineering and Built Design, Deakin University
(5) Engineering and Built Design, Deakin University

Database: Engineering Collection