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Management of clavicular fractures in the soldier - throw out the recipe book

Australian Military Medicine
Volume 14 Issue 1 (2005 Apr)

Abstract: Fractures of the clavicle are very common and often effectively managed non-operatively, especially when they occur in the middle third. Malunion is the expected outcome, which fortunately does not usually produce a significant functional limitation in the general population (1). In soldiers, however, there may exist a subgroup of the population in whom traditional non-operative management and results may impart a disability, which may then affect performance, and a subsequent downgrading of their PULHEEMS Employment Standard (PES). Given their requirement to carry heavy packs and webbing, and the physical demands of their profession, there has been discussion favouring the increased use of internal fixation. This paper discusses the classification of clavicular fractures and their prognosis in the general population. The options of operative and non-operative methods of treatment are compared for each fracture type. Mid-clavicular fractures, which are the most common in the general population, may benefit from open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) in soldiers with a view to minimising the degree of malunion. The outcome of ORIF needs to be balanced nonetheless against the complication rate associated with operative intervention, so as to inform the reader of the balance of factors associated with such decision making. (author abstract)

To cite this article: Cunningham, JE and Ellis, AM. Management of clavicular fractures in the soldier - throw out the recipe book [online]. Australian Military Medicine, Vol. 14, No. 1, 2005 Apr: 16-20. Availability: <http://search.informit.com.au/documentSummary;dn=502668333436616;res=IELHEA> ISSN: 1443-7058. [cited 28 Jun 17].

Personal Author: Cunningham, JE; Ellis, AM; Source: Australian Military Medicine, Vol. 14, No. 1, 2005 Apr: 16-20 DOI: Document Type: Journal Article ISSN: 1443-7058 Subject: Soldiers; Affiliation: (1) Orthopaedics, Mona Vale Hospital, Mona Vale NSW
(2) Orthopaedics, Mona Vale Hospital, Mona Vale NSW

Database: Health Collection