searching Health Collection Change databases

Image of Publication

  • Peer Reviewed
  • Citation only


about this publication

The Zoonotic Potential of Dogs in Aboriginal Communities in Central Australia

Environmental Health
Volume 7 Issue 4 (2007)

Abstract: This article reviews the established zoonoses from dogs, and identifies the potential burden of speculative zoonoses of canine origin in Aboriginal communities in Central Australia. A variety of organisms such as bacteria, viruses, and parasites including protozoa, ectoparasites and helminths (worms) have possible zoonotic capability; these organisms are discussed. Observational research was conducted in seven Aboriginal Town Camps of Alice Springs to describe the human and dog interactions and behaviours, and risk factors for transmission. Information was also gathered on the cultural significance of dogs to Aboriginal people in the community under observation. The relationship between Aboriginal people and their dogs appears to be not only one of companionship, but involves other more complex cultural factors. The contribution dogs make to infections and infestations of Aboriginal people in communities throughout Australia remains unclear. Education and dog health programs have an important role in reducing the risk of canine-related human morbidity in Aboriginal communities.

To cite this article: Gaskin, Sharyn; Bentham, Richard; Cromar, Nancy and Fallowfield, Howard. The Zoonotic Potential of Dogs in Aboriginal Communities in Central Australia [online]. Environmental Health, Vol. 7, No. 4, 2007: 36-45. Availability: <http://search.informit.com.au/documentSummary;dn=997869549509147;res=IELHEA> ISSN: 1444-5212. [cited 31 Aug 16].

Personal Author: Gaskin, Sharyn; Bentham, Richard; Cromar, Nancy; Fallowfield, Howard; Source: Environmental Health, Vol. 7, No. 4, 2007: 36-45 Document Type: Journal Article ISSN: 1444-5212 EISSN: 1832-3367 Subject: Zoonoses; Aboriginal Australians--Diseases; Communicable diseases in animals; Dogs--Diseases; Dogs as carriers of disease; Peer Reviewed: Yes Affiliation: (1) Department of Environmental Health, School of Medicine, Flinders University of South Australia, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide 5001, Australia, email: sharyn.gaskin@flinders.edu.au
(2) Department of Environmental Health, Flinders University of South Australia
(3) Department of Environmental Health, Flinders University of South Australia
(4) Department of Environmental Health, Flinders University of South Australia

Database: Health Collection