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Differences between Older Adult Volunteers and Non-volunteers in Depression and Self-efficacy

Australian Journal on Volunteering
Volume 12 Issue 2 (2007)

Abstract: High levels of self-efficacy are associated with successfully handling stressful situations and increased confidence and independence. This study explored whether self-efficacy was also related to volunteering among older adults. Levels of self-efficacy and depression were contrasted among 87 older volunteers and 84 non-volunteers on measures of self-efficacy, depression, years of education and age. The study hypothesis was that self-efficacy and depression would be the most salient measures in discriminating between volunteers and non-volunteers. The results found that self-efficacy, depression and age all discriminated significantly between volunteers and non-volunteers. The present study highlights the importance volunteering may have in fostering self-efficacy in older people, and while exploratory in nature, it has important implications for promoting independent functioning in later life and improving the quality of life of older people.

To cite this article: Helmes, Edward and Govindan, Anita. Differences between Older Adult Volunteers and Non-volunteers in Depression and Self-efficacy [online]. Australian Journal on Volunteering, Vol. 12, No. 2, 2007: 30-36. Availability: <http://search.informit.com.au/documentSummary;dn=929542443905327;res=IELHSS> ISSN: 1325-8362. [cited 28 Jul 16].

Personal Author: Helmes, Edward; Govindan, Anita; Source: Australian Journal on Volunteering, Vol. 12, No. 2, 2007: 30-36 Document Type: Journal Article ISSN: 1325-8362 Subject: Volunteer workers in social service; Voluntarism; Older volunteers; Peer Reviewed: Yes Affiliation: (1) Professor of Psychology, and Director of Professional Programs, James Cook University, Townsville, Australia
(2) Doctor of Psychology Program, Deakin University, and Clinical Work, the Mental Health Program in Werribee, Victoria

Database: Humanities & Social Sciences Collection