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Abstract: The behaviour and physiology of intensively housed animals will be negatively affected when the environmental temperature is above their thermo-neutral zone (TNZ). It is likely that production efficiency, welfare, health and reproductive capacity of the animals will be compromised. Traditional technologies, such as the use of different cooling systems and better building design, can be used to alleviate the negative effects of high temperatures on animals. However, there are real opportunities to further develop climate control technologies and create intelligent environmental control systems that will be able to predict and therefore control both the responses of animals and the buildings in relation to selected control interventions.

To cite this article: Banhazi, Thomas; Thuy, Huynh; Pedersen, Soeren; Payne, Hugh; Mullan, Bruce; Berckmans, Daniel; Aarnink, Andre and Hartung, Jorg. Review of the Consequences and Control of High Air Temperatures in Intensive Livestock Buildings [online]. Australian Journal of Multi-disciplinary Engineering, Vol. 7, No. 1, 2009: 63-78. Availability: <http://search.informit.com.au/documentSummary;dn=865737464127116;res=IELENG> ISSN: 1448-8388. [cited 29 Apr 16].

Personal Author: Banhazi, Thomas; Thuy, Huynh; Pedersen, Soeren; Payne, Hugh; Mullan, Bruce; Berckmans, Daniel; Aarnink, Andre; Hartung, Jorg; Source: Australian Journal of Multi-disciplinary Engineering, Vol. 7, No. 1, 2009: 63-78 Document Type: Journal Article ISSN: 1448-8388 Subject: Swine--Housing--Heating and ventilation; Livestock--Housing--Heating and ventilation; Animal housing--Climate; Livestock--Climatic factors; Peer Reviewed: Yes Affiliation: (1) Senior Research Scientist, South Australian Research and Development Institute (Livestock System Alliance), and Vice-President, International Commission for Agricultural Engineering, and Chair, Australian Society for Engineering in Agriculture, email: banhazi.thomas@saugov.sa.gov.au
(2) HCMC Department of Animal Health, Ministry of Agricultural and Rural Development, Vietnam
(3) Department of Agricultural Engineering Centre, University of Aarhus, Bygholm, Denmark
(4) Senior Technical Officer, Animal Research and Development Division, Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia
(5) Animal Research and Development, Department of Agriculture and Food, Bentley, Western Australia
(6) Head of the M3-Biores Division, Department of Biosystems, Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium
(7) Senior Researcher, Field of Livestock Environment
(8) Veterinarian and the Director, Institute for Animal Hygiene, Animal Welfare and Farm Animal Behaviour of the University of Veterinary Medicine, Hannover, Germany, and Vice-president, Scientific Panel for Animal Health and Welfare of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), and Chairman, Federal Committee for Animal Welfare Germany

Database: Engineering Collection