searching Health Collection Change databases

Image of Publication

  • Peer Reviewed
  • Citation only


about this publication

Managing bio-burden and devitalised tissue: An early intervention using Woundaid

Wound Practice & Research: Journal of the Australian Wound Management Association
Volume 19 Issue 3 (Sept 2011)

Abstract: Complex wound management provides many challenges to the clinician, all of which are determined by the presentation of the wound and the aims for healing. How we, as clinicians, approach this may be determined by our individual wound assessment, best practice and also our own clinical experience. Wound bed preparation maximises the optimal wound healing environment; necrotic tissue is related to bacterial load and can have an adverse effect on wound healing. Necrotic tissue can be managed by debridement in the majority of wounds. However, this should only be considered following full assessment of the ability of the wound to heal and the patient's pre-existing comorbidities. Autolytic debridement uses moisture-retentive dressings to facilitate the breakdown of necrotic tissue. Today there is a diverse range of wound care products designed to promote moist wound healing. Choice of dressing may be determined by availability, ease of use or cost-effectiveness. But how often is a product chosen for its anti-inflammatory activity or antimicrobial action when debridement is the initial goal? This article reports the management of three case studies taking this early approach using a relatively new product called Woundaid. The outcomes of this "first line" method of wound debridement and the positive outcome in wound healing can be seen. This is the first publication relating to this therapy according to current literature.

To cite this article: Webber, L. Managing bio-burden and devitalised tissue: An early intervention using Woundaid [online]. Wound Practice & Research: Journal of the Australian Wound Management Association, Vol. 19, No. 3, Sept 2011: 174-179. Availability: <http://search.informit.com.au/documentSummary;dn=628354985164165;res=IELHEA> ISSN: 1837-6304. [cited 25 Mar 17].

Personal Author: Webber, L; Source: Wound Practice & Research: Journal of the Australian Wound Management Association, Vol. 19, No. 3, Sept 2011: 174-179 DOI: Document Type: Journal Article ISSN: 1837-6304 Subject: Health services administrators; Wounds and injuries--Treatment; Wounds and injuries--Nursing; Peer Reviewed: Yes

Database: Health Collection