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Abstract: This article forms part of our 'Tests and results' series for 2011 which aims to provide information about common tests that general practitioners order regularly. It considers areas such as indications, what to tell the patient, what the test can and cannot tell you, and interpretation of results. Ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) monitoring involves measuring blood pressure (BP) at regular intervals (usually every 20-30 minutes) over a 24 hour period while patients undergo normal daily activities, including sleep. The portable monitor is worn on a belt connected to a standard cuff on the upper arm and uses an oscillometric technique to detect systolic, diastolic and mean BP as well as heart rate. When complete, the device is connected to a computer that prepares a report of the 24 hour, day time, night time, and sleep and awake (if recorded) average systolic and diastolic BP and heart rate.

To cite this article: Head, Geoffrey A; McGrath, Barry P; Mihailidou, Anastasia S; Nelson, Mark R; Schlaich, Markus P; Stowasser, Michael; Mangoni, Arduino A; Cowley, Diane and Wilson, Alison. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring [online]. Australian Family Physician, Vol. 40, No. 11, Nov 2011: 877-880. Availability: <http://search.informit.com.au/documentSummary;dn=534631139735419;res=IELHEA> ISSN: 0300-8495. [cited 26 Jun 16].

Personal Author: Head, Geoffrey A; McGrath, Barry P; Mihailidou, Anastasia S; Nelson, Mark R; Schlaich, Markus P; Stowasser, Michael; Mangoni, Arduino A; Cowley, Diane; Wilson, Alison; Source: Australian Family Physician, Vol. 40, No. 11, Nov 2011: 877-880 Document Type: Journal Article ISSN: 0300-8495 Subject: Ambulatory medical care; Patient monitoring--Equipment and supplies; Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring; Blood pressure--Measurement; Peer Reviewed: Yes Affiliation: (1) Monash University Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, Victoria,geoff.head@bakeridi.edu.au
(2) Department of Cardiology and the Kolling Institute of Medical Research, Royal North Shore Hospital and the University of Sydney, New South Wales
(3) Discipline of General Practice, School of Medicine, University of Tasmania andMenzies Research Institute Tasmania
(4) Neurovascular Hypertension & Kidney Disease, Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, Victoria
(5) University of Queensland School of Medicine, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland
(6) Division of Applied Medicine, University of Aberdeen, United Kingdom
(7) University of Queensland School of Medicine, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland
(8) Heart Foundation, Melbourne, Victoria

Database: Health Collection