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Abstract: Alexander Neumann was born on October 15, 1861 in the tiny village of Heinzendorf, near Bielitz in the region of Silesia, close to the Polish border in the present-day Czech Republic. Neumann's father owned a factory in nearby Teschen (now Cieszyn, in Poland). Alexander Neumann attended school (Realschule) in Bielitz until the age of 21, when he entered the the Technische Hochschule Wien (Vienna University of Technology) to study architecture. There he attended the lectures of both Heinrich von Ferstel (1828-83) and Carl Konig (1841-1915), two architects widely appreciated for their commitment, to differing degrees, to the eclectic historicism still widely favoured at that time.2 Von Ferstel was appointed Chair of Architecture at the Technische Hochschule in 1866, in which year Konig was named his assistant. Christopher Long has argued that Konig came to assert a major historicist influence over the school when he assumed control of the design studios for advanced architecture students.3 Among his students in this advanced atelier was Neumann.

To cite this article: McAlpine, Fiona and Leach, Andrew. The bank buildings of Alexander Neumann: Prague, Vienna and Graz, 1906-20 [online]. Fabrications: The Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand, Vol. 20, No. 1, Jan 2011: 6-29. Availability: <http://search.informit.com.au/documentSummary;dn=481862565132196;res=IELHSS> ISSN: 1033-1867. [cited 12 Feb 16].

Personal Author: McAlpine, Fiona; Leach, Andrew; Source: Fabrications: The Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand, Vol. 20, No. 1, Jan 2011: 6-29 Document Type: Journal Article ISSN: 1033-1867 Subject: Building--Design and construction; Building sites; Designs and plans; Architecture--Design; Identifier: Neumann, Alexander Peer Reviewed: Yes

Database: Humanities & Social Sciences Collection