searching Business Collection Change databases

Image of Publication

  • Peer Reviewed
  • Citation only


about this publication

Abstract: The Snowden revelations have renewed interest in questions surrounding jurisdictional issues about where data is kept (location) and who claims the capacity to direct access to it be given by the entity hosting it (control). While early attitudes to the cluster of technologies marketed as The Cloud generally played down this aspect, and unilateral contracts offered by many major providers declined to specify these parameters for the technical provision of a Cloud service, growing appreciation that assurances of security and confidentiality are no barrier to certain forms of access being granted to third parties in other jurisdictions has rekindled interest. This paper explores the technical and legal issues involved from the perspective of an Australian business interested in both customer and government attitudes, and discusses how moves to implement jurisdiction location and control preferences have been characterised as Data Sovereignty and Digital Protectionism by differing interests.

To cite this article: Vaile, David. The Cloud and data sovereignty after Snowden [online]. Australian Journal of Telecommunications and the Digital Economy, Vol. 2, No. 1, Mar 2014: [31.1]-[31.58]. Availability: <http://search.informit.com.au/documentSummary;dn=187308443693292;res=IELBUS> ISSN: 2203-1693. [cited 30 May 17].

Personal Author: Vaile, David; Source: Australian Journal of Telecommunications and the Digital Economy, Vol. 2, No. 1, Mar 2014: [31.1]-[31.58] DOI: Document Type: Journal Article ISSN: 2203-1693 Subject: Cloud computing; Database security; Sovereignty--Social aspects; Jurisdiction; Risk management--Methodology; Peer Reviewed: Yes Affiliation: (1) Co-convenor, Cyberspace Law and Policy Community, UNSW Faculty of Law

Database: Business Collection