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Domiculture or complex hunter-gathering?: A comment on Aurukun shell mound vegetation

Australian Aboriginal Studies
Issue 1 (1989)

Abstract: In the most recent issue of the Journal, Cribb et al (1988, 60) record the plants found on shell mounds and use biogeographic theories to analyse the results. They conclude that the result 'lends some support to the role of humans in influencing the composition of this subcommunity'. Elsewhere they refer to the 'domiculture' (that is incipient cultivation) theory of Hynes and Chase (1982) and suggest that the mounds may be further examples of such activity The evidence for this is that the mounds apparently contain a high proportion of 'useful' species, that is species which provide food for humans or from which products suitable for artefact manufacture can be obtained.

To cite this article: Horton, David. Domiculture or complex hunter-gathering?: A comment on Aurukun shell mound vegetation [online]. Australian Aboriginal Studies, No. 1, 1989: 45-49. Availability: <http://search.informit.com.au/documentSummary;dn=160879629858175;res=IELIND> ISSN: 0729-4352. [cited 26 Jun 17].

Personal Author: Horton, David; Source: Australian Aboriginal Studies, No. 1, 1989: 45-49 DOI: Document Type: Journal Article ISSN: 0729-4352 Subject: Biogeography; Surface of the Earth; Mountain plants; Agriculture--Economic aspects; Affiliation: (1) Australian Institute of Aboriginal Studies

Database: Indigenous Collection