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Abstract: Objective: To investigate whether an adjustment to any segment in the spine resulted in a blood pressure change and to see whether the direction of any potential blood pressure changes were dependent on the region of the spine adjusted. Methods: Participants included 70 patients attending the New Zealand College of Chiropractic Student Health Centre. Blood pressure was recorded by a blinded examiner before and after either a single Diversified type chiropractic adjustment or an adjustment set-up with no thrust. Participants were randomly allocated to groups. Each trial was allocated to a subgroup based on the spinal region involved. Some participants were involved in more than one trial session with a total of 118 trials included in the study. Results: Multifactorial repeated measures ANOVA assessing for any effect from the adjustment revealed a significant overall interactive effect for the factors TIME (pre / post) and GROUP (adjustment / control) [F (1,103)=4.23, p=0.042] for systolic blood pressure. Further analysis of the adjustment group revealed a significant overall effect [F (1,49)=10.89, p=0.002] with systolic blood pressure decreasing significantly (-3.9 +/- 10.3mmHg) following an adjustment. No other significant differences were found in the adjustment or control groups. Conclusion: An adjustment to any segment in the spine resulted in a statistically significant average decrease in systolic blood pressure of 3.9 mmHg. The direction of blood pressure change that was observed was not dependent on the region of the spine adjusted. However, visual analysis suggests cervical and lumbopelvic adjustments had a greater influence on systolic blood pressure than thoracic adjustments. Diastolic blood pressure remained relatively constant. Average changes in blood pressure were unlikely to be clinically significant. However, in individual participants some blood pressure changes were considered to be clinically relevant following an adjustment.

To cite this article: Holt, Kelly; Beck, Randy; Sexton, Stephen and Taylor, Heidi Haavik. Reflex Effects of a Spinal Adjustment on Blood Pressure [online]. Chiropractic Journal of Australia, Vol. 40, No. 3, Sep 2010: 95-99. Availability: <http://search.informit.com.au/documentSummary;dn=083061081292942;res=IELHEA> ISSN: 1036-0913. [cited 28 Jun 17].

Personal Author: Holt, Kelly; Beck, Randy; Sexton, Stephen; Taylor, Heidi Haavik; Source: Chiropractic Journal of Australia, Vol. 40, No. 3, Sep 2010: 95-99 DOI: Document Type: Journal Article ISSN: 1036-0913 Subject: Blood pressure--Regulation; Chiropractic; Spinal adjustment--Physiological aspects; Autonomic nervous system; Peer Reviewed: Yes Affiliation: (1) Assistant Director of Research, Research Department, New Zealand College of Chiropractic, Auckland, New Zealand
(2) Lecturer (Clinical Neurology, Clinical Diagnosis), Division of Health and Science, Murdoch University, Perth, Western Australia
(3) Lecturer (Clinical Neurology), Carrick Institute for Graduate Studies,Cape Canaveral, Florida, USA
(4) Director of Research, Research Department, New Zealand College of Chiropractic, Auckland, New Zealand

Database: Health Collection