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Radio Art: The Age of the "Bunker" Artist, Digging in Deeper, Spreading Thinner

Vital Signs: Creative Practice & New Media Now

Abstract: The US military developed the internet as a communications tool during the cold war, if one node was destroyed then the system would re-route and find another path. With the advent of online audio streaming, which audio "nodes" will be blown out of existence, and who will be surviving deep inside the "bunkers". With Creative Commons, Open and Free, and using a free operating system for "microradio" (like Auppix) just about anyone can start a streaming internet radio station. Then with August Black's "Userradio" and "Streaps", internet radio becomes interactive, produced by simultaneous multi-site broadcasters and randomised by intervention. Meanwhile major players like the ABC (Australia) are conducting surveys and experiments into new delivery models for radio. According to the U.S., Bridge Ratings research there are likely to be 35 million satellite radio subscribers by 2010. The forecast for internet radio is an increase form the current 50 million to 187 million users within 5 years. "wireless internet radio represents the biggest challenge - not satellite radio", Dave Van Dyke (President of Bridge) said. Like Motorola's recently demonstrated iRadio, it seems to forecast a flood of portable devices (like iPods and mobile phones) with docking ports in every room and car connected to your audio system. What does this all mean for Radio Art? Well the latest trend for the ABC (Australia) is to have Radio Art with a predominate "musical" content to be broadcast unannounced on ABC Classic FM, with no flag ship programme. While "acoustic arts" being broadcast in LoFi AM mono on Radio National. This trend seems to be echoed in the Netherlands with theirs acoustic arts programme, Caf Sonor recently reduced to LowFi mono after being threatened with annihilation. Is there some connection between the rise of independent streaming internet arts radio stations and the decline of major networks support for Radio Art? Who's streaming? And is there anyone listening outside the walls of the 'bunker'?

To cite this article: Black, Colin. Radio Art: The Age of the "Bunker" Artist, Digging in Deeper, Spreading Thinner [online]. In: Jones, Lyndal (Editor); Anastasiou, Pauline (Editor); Smithies, Rhonda (Editor); Trist, Karen (Editor). Vital Signs: Creative Practice & New Media Now. Melbourne, Vic.: RMIT Publishing, 2005: iv, 22 p. Availability: <http://search.informit.com.au/documentSummary;dn=031172368128134;res=IELHSS> EISBN: 1921166118. [cited 29 Aug 16].

Personal Author: Black, Colin; Source: In: Jones, Lyndal (Editor); Anastasiou, Pauline (Editor); Smithies, Rhonda (Editor); Trist, Karen (Editor). Vital Signs: Creative Practice & New Media Now. Melbourne, Vic.: RMIT Publishing, 2005: iv, 22 p. Document Type: Conference Paper, Research EISBN: 1921166118 Peer Reviewed: Yes Affiliation: (1) Composer/Sound Artist

Database: Humanities & Social Sciences Collection